dribbblepopular:

Skateboard Loop Original: http://ift.tt/1DnjJMP

dribbblepopular:

Skateboard Loop Original: http://ift.tt/1DnjJMP

Reblogged from streetpiracy, 331 notes, October 20, 2014

northskatemag:

The Panoramic Series.

Phil Evans continues his Panoramic Series with this treat. Paris with Bastien Duverdier and Joseph Biais.

Reblogged from northskatemag, 15 notes, October 20, 2014

History of the World

Good place to start.

1 note, October 20, 2014

mpdrolet:

Lisa Lindvay

mpdrolet:

Lisa Lindvay

Reblogged from nocoastoffense, 279 notes, October 19, 2014

I don’t think one has to necessarily stray into value judgments or aesthetics in order to speak critically of certain sides of skateboarding. 
For instance, one can see the photo above and think, what the fuck is this? without saying even a word about what’s “better” or “right” in skating. One only has to ask: do you want to do this? Is this a shape you want to comport your own arms and legs and shoulders into? Do you ever want your feet to get into this position, or even one half as extreme, gearing up nollie with your weight all pinched onto your toes? Of course you don’t.
In that way we thank him for doing what nobody else ever has to, ever again. This is what it is to behave in an original but fundamentally silly way. I hope he gets paid, of course. Dude has been working.

I don’t think one has to necessarily stray into value judgments or aesthetics in order to speak critically of certain sides of skateboarding. 

For instance, one can see the photo above and think, what the fuck is this? without saying even a word about what’s “better” or “right” in skating. One only has to ask: do you want to do this? Is this a shape you want to comport your own arms and legs and shoulders into? Do you ever want your feet to get into this position, or even one half as extreme, gearing up nollie with your weight all pinched onto your toes? Of course you don’t.

In that way we thank him for doing what nobody else ever has to, ever again. This is what it is to behave in an original but fundamentally silly way. I hope he gets paid, of course. Dude has been working.

6 notes, October 16, 2014

magictransistor:

Arnold Böcklin, Die Toteninsel (Isle of the Dead), 1880-1886.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Reblogged from hungryghoast, 1,369 notes, October 16, 2014

mostlyskateboarding:

Jonathan Thijs by DVL from A Brief Glance #26.

Breadth, here, aspect ratio upends the common assumption of skater violence against his chosen terrain

mostlyskateboarding:

Jonathan Thijs by DVL from A Brief Glance #26.

Breadth, here, aspect ratio upends the common assumption of skater violence against his chosen terrain

Reblogged from mostlyskateboarding, 84 notes, October 15, 2014

jordanvoth:

Elise

jordanvoth:

Elise

Reblogged from liveridiculously, 119 notes, October 15, 2014

new-aesthetic:

August’s Smart Lock Goes On Sale Online And At Apple Retail Stores For $250 | TechCrunch

That said, the August unit didn’t operate perfectly all the time. Every now and then it didn’t recognize my phone as I approached the door. One time I made it all the way to the door before realizing that I was no longer signed into the app for some reason. There was also one late night when a stranger opened the door and walked into the house when August should have auto-locked the door. (The stranger was trying to enter our next-door neighbor’s house and didn’t realize he was at the wrong door.)

new-aesthetic:

August’s Smart Lock Goes On Sale Online And At Apple Retail Stores For $250 | TechCrunch

That said, the August unit didn’t operate perfectly all the time. Every now and then it didn’t recognize my phone as I approached the door. One time I made it all the way to the door before realizing that I was no longer signed into the app for some reason. There was also one late night when a stranger opened the door and walked into the house when August should have auto-locked the door. (The stranger was trying to enter our next-door neighbor’s house and didn’t realize he was at the wrong door.)

Reblogged from new-aesthetic, 90 notes, October 15, 2014

56

thepointmag:

On intentionality: it doesn’t so much matter what a thing is, or the countless things that it isn’t, as long as it is on purpose. We rarely wish to get lucky with our success, and it rarely happens anyway, outside of the strange and socially awkward creation of Penicillin, or arguably the invention of flying. Waking up to hot coffee is as American as baseball or second-guessing, and iced coffee can be loosely described as hipster, or perhaps the drink of choice when housewives run out of Ritalin. But there is nothing worse, nothing so undrinkable, than hot coffee gone cold or iced coffee melted. Its purpose has been lost; it has done the terrifying act of going off-script; it is unintentional. Nothing could be more potentially catastrophic to the well-planned afternoon than the accident, than hot coffee gone cold. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t drink it anyway.

Jake Wrenn

Bravo, Jake.

Reblogged from thepointmag, 4 notes, October 14, 2014

"

Early hypertext theorists seemed to point toward a future in which the many texts with which readers and researchers engage would be richly interconnected and weblike, permitting that engagement to fully instantiate the ideas proposed in some poststructuralist theory. The chunked, rhizomatic text would produce a reader who was a full partner with the author in the text’s production. Texts, it seemed, would become multimodal, fluid, and nonlinear.

But by and large they haven’t. The shape of the book remains very much what it has for centuries been: linear, textual, and relatively solid. This comparative stability in the face of massive technological (and not insignificant social) change — including the movement of the book onto networked screens — leads me to believe that the bookness of the book inheres in something other than its delivery system: it’s not about the print, or the binding, but something else.

"

Kathleen Fitzpatrick on the philosophy of the book

5 notes, October 10, 2014

Lit & Luz: A Reading by Valeria Luiselli at Roosevelt University | Facebook

makelit:

Valeria Luiselli, author of “Faces in the Crowd” and the essay collection, “Sidewalks” to read on Wednesday, October 15, at Roosevelt University’s Gage Gallery as part of the #LitLuz Fest.

http://bit.ly/1uGVJB2

Come meet the recent National Book Foundation’s ‘5 under 35’ honoree for yourself!

Wednesday, Oct. 15, 5PM 

The Gage Gallery, 18 S. Michigan
Roosevelt University
Free Admission

Reblogged from makelit, 1 note, October 9, 2014

Geti. King.

0 notes, October 8, 2014

dialecstatic:

dangerously close to BOASTING here
but this morning i’ve already bought 65 kazoos and made some art about theoretical math 
so
pretty good little tuesday so far

Ladies and gentlemen, my future wife. (“if infinity exists how can infinity exist”)

dialecstatic:

dangerously close to BOASTING here

but this morning i’ve already bought 65 kazoos and made some art about theoretical math 

so

pretty good little tuesday so far

Ladies and gentlemen, my future wife. (“if infinity exists how can infinity exist”)

Reblogged from dialecstatic, 10 notes, September 30, 2014

savage-america:


Humans could not be removed from slaughter – one senses a kind of cosmic justice there, that we are unable to turn the process over to a whirring box – and the implications of this failure of mechanisation were far-reaching. “For the speeding of output there was but one solution: to eliminate loss of time between each operation and the next, and to reduce the energy expended by the worker on the manipulation of heavy carcasses.” The slaughterline was created, with animals hooked onto pulleys and rails to be pushed between workers, each of whom specialised in a specific task. This was the birth of the modern assembly line, and thus of modernity itself.

Slaughterhouses: Meat is modernism

savage-america:

Humans could not be removed from slaughter – one senses a kind of cosmic justice there, that we are unable to turn the process over to a whirring box – and the implications of this failure of mechanisation were far-reaching. “For the speeding of output there was but one solution: to eliminate loss of time between each operation and the next, and to reduce the energy expended by the worker on the manipulation of heavy carcasses.” The slaughterline was created, with animals hooked onto pulleys and rails to be pushed between workers, each of whom specialised in a specific task. This was the birth of the modern assembly line, and thus of modernity itself.

Slaughterhouses: Meat is modernism

Reblogged from savage-america, 12 notes, September 30, 2014